Film Review – THE WILD GEESE (1978)

Image result for the wild geese 1978Wild Geese, The (1978; UK/Switzerland; Eastmancolor; 134m) ∗∗∗  d. Andrew V. McLaglen; w. Reginald Rose; ph. Jack Hildyard; m. Roy Budd.  Cast: Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Roger Moore, Hardy Kruger, Stewart Granger, Jack Watson, Frank Finlay, Jeff Corey, Winston Ntshona, John Kani, Jack Watson, Kenneth Griffith, Barry Foster, Ronald Fraser, Ian Yule. A British multinational seeks to overthrow a vicious dictator in central Africa. It hires a band of (largely aged) mercenaries in London and sends them in to save the virtuous but imprisoned opposition leader who is also critically ill and due for execution. Whilst this action thriller may be littered with cliches and weighed down by a by-the-numbers script, there is still much to enjoy. The lead performances are strong and the action sequences well directed. Some clumsy and dated handling of the racial politics aside this makes for diverting viewing. Based on the novel by Daniel Carney. Followed by WILD GEESE II (1985). [15]

Film Review – A VIEW TO A KILL (1985)

View to a Kill, A (1985; UK/USA; Metrocolor; 131m) ∗∗½  d. John Glen; w. Richard Maibaum, Michael G. Wilson; ph. Alan Hume; m. John Barry.  Cast: Roger Moore, Christopher Walken, Tanya Roberts, Grace Jones, Patrick Macnee, Patrick Bauchau, David Yip, Fiona Fullerton, Manning Redwood, Alison Doody, Willoughby Gray, Desmond Llewelyn, Robert Brown, Lois Maxwell, Walter Gotell, Geoffrey Keen. An investigation of a horse-racing scam leads 007 to a mad industrialist who plans to create a worldwide microchip monopoly by destroying California’s Silicon Valley. Moore’s last outing has an end-of-term feel about it. The plot recycles GOLDFINGER, but the creative energy that made that film so enjoyable is sadly missing here. All the boxes are ticked but without the enthusiasm or originality that made the earlier films so special. Based on the short story “From a View to a Kill” by Ian Fleming. [PG]

Film Review – OCTOPUSSY (1983)

Octopussy (1983; UK/USA; Technicolor; 131m) ∗∗∗  d. John Glen; w. George MacDonald, Richard Maibaum, Michael G. Wilson; ph. Alan Hume; m. John Barry.  Cast: Roger Moore, Maud Adams, Louis Jourdan, Kristina Wayborn, Kabir Bedi, Steven Berkoff, David Meyer, Tony Meyer, Desmond Llewelyn, Robert Brown, Lois Maxwell, Michaela Clavell, Walter Gotell, Vijay Amritraj, Albert Moses. A fake Fabergé egg and a fellow agent’s death leads James Bond to uncovering an international jewel smuggling operation, headed by the mysterious Octopussy, being used to disguise a nuclear attack on NATO forces. A mixed bag with some excellent action sequences again deflated by occasional lapses into childish humour. Jourdan makes for a strong villain, but by now Moore is too old to play 007 and is going through the motions. The whole production also feels more than a little bloated with one climax too many. Based on a short story by Ian Fleming. [PG]

Film Review – FOR YOUR EYES ONLY (1981)

For Your Eyes Only (1981; UK; Technicolor; 127m) ∗∗∗½  d. John Glen; w. Richard Maibaum, Michael G. Wilson; ph. Alan Hume; m. Bill Conti.  Cast: Roger Moore, Carole Bouquet, Topol, Lois Maxwell, Lynn-Holly Johnson, Julian Glover, Jill Bennett, Desmond Llewelyn, Geoffrey Keen, Walter Gotell, Cassandra Harris, Michael Gothard, John Wyman, Jack Hedley, James Villiers. Agent 007 is assigned to hunt for a lost British encryption device and prevent it from falling into enemy hands. This is the straightest Bond for quite some time – and all the better for it. There are occasional lapses in pace and despite giving one of his best perfomances as 007 Moore is beginning to look a little old for the part, but the breathless action sequences deliver plenty of thrills. Conti’s jazzy synth-laden score, however, is the weakest of the series. Based on the short stories “For Your Eyes Only” and “Risico” by Ian Fleming. [PG]

Film Review – MOONRAKER (1979)

Moonraker (1979; UK/France; Technicolor; 126m) ∗∗  d. Lewis Gilbert; w. Christopher Wood; ph. Jean Tournier; m. John Barry.  Cast: Roger Moore, Lois Chiles, Michael Lonsdale, Richard Kiel, Corinne Cléry, Bernard Lee, Geoffrey Keen, Desmond Llewelyn, Lois Maxwell, Toshirô Suga, Emily Bolton, Blanche Ravalec. James Bond investigates the mid-air theft of a space shuttle and discovers a plot to commit global genocide. After a promising start 007 goes OTT in this misconceived bomb that just gets more and more absurd. Too often promising set-pieces are flattened by the need to add a comedic punch-line. Kiel’s Jaws is turned into a cartoonish buffoon and Moore delivers his laziest performance to date. Lonsdale is the film’s only saving grace as a Bond villain who deserved a better film. Based on the novel by Ian Fleming. [PG]

Film Review – THE SPY WHO LOVED ME (1977)

Spy Who Loved Me, The (1977; UK; Colour; 125m) ∗∗∗½  d. Lewis Gilbert; w. Christopher Wood, Richard Maibaum; ph. Claude Renoir; m. Marvin Hamlisch.  Cast: Roger Moore, Barbara Bach, Curd Jürgens, Richard Kiel, Caroline Munro, Walter Gotell, Geoffrey Keen, Bernard Lee, George Baker, Michael Billington, Olga Bisera, Desmond Llewelyn, Edward de Souza, Vernon Dobtcheff, Valerie Leon, Lois Maxwell. James Bond investigates the hijacking of British and Russian submarines carrying nuclear warheads with the help of a KGB agent whose lover he killed. Moore finds his feet in his third outing as agent 007. The plot involves a global threat and the action set-pieces are exceptionally well-handled. Kiel makes a memorable heavy as the steel-toothed Jaws. Benefits from exceptional production design and exotic locations. There are still occasional lapses into slapstick and heavy-handed humour, but overall this is perhaps Moore’s strongest outing. Based on the novel by Ian Fleming. [PG]

Film Review – THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN (1974)

Man with the Golden Gun, The (1974; UK; Colour; 125m) ∗∗∗  d. Guy Hamilton; w. Richard Maibaum, Tom Mankiewicz; ph. Ted Moore, Oswald Morris; m. John Barry.  Cast: Roger Moore, Christopher Lee, Britt Ekland, Maud Adams, Hervé Villechaize, Clifton James, Richard Loo, Soon-Tek Oh, Marc Lawrence, Bernard Lee, Lois Maxwell, Marne Maitland, Desmond Llewelyn, James Cossins, Yao Lin Chen. Bond is led to believe that he is targeted by the world’s most expensive assassin and must hunt him down to stop him. Moore’s second outing as 007 starts well, with little reliance on gadgets, but later the action descends into increasingly comedic set-pieces. Lee is a strong villain, but the plot is lacking any threat beyond that to Bond himself. Exotic locations and good production values, but Ekland is given an idiotic role whilst Adams is underused as the Bond girls. Based on the novel by Ian Fleming. [PG]

Film Review – LIVE AND LET DIE (1973)

Live and Let Die (1973; UK; Colour; 121m) ∗∗∗  d. Guy Hamilton; w. Tom Mankiewicz; ph. Ted Moore; m. George Martin.  Cast: Roger Moore, Yaphet Kotto, Jane Seymour, Clifton James, Julius Harris, Geoffrey Holder, David Hedison, Gloria Hendry, Bernard Lee, Lois Maxwell, Tommy Lane, Earl Jolly Brown, Roy Stewart. 007 is sent to stop a diabolically brilliant heroin magnate armed with a complex organization and a reliable psychic tarot card reader. Moore’s debut continues in the same vein as DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER with his glib, almost dismissive approach adding a lighter touch. Despite some atmospheric scenes involving voodoo rituals, comedic overtones increasingly begin to dominate at the expense of suspense, but it does boast one of the series’ strongest themes (courtesy of Paul & Linda McCartney) and a well-staged boat chase. Based on the novel by Ian Fleming. [PG]

Film Review Round-up – Three more Bonds – FOR YOUR EYES ONLY (1981); FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE (1963) and GOLDENEYE (1995)

81947_largeFor Your Eyes Only (1981; UK; Technicolor; 127m) ∗∗∗½  d. John Glen; w. Richard Maibaum, Michael G. Wilson; ph. Alan Hume; m. Bill Conti; ed. John Grover.  Cast: Roger Moore, Carole Bouquet, Topol, Lois Maxwell, Lynn-Holly Johnson, Julian Glover, Jill Bennett, Desmond Llewelyn, Geoffrey Keen, Walter Gotell, Cassandra Harris, Michael Gothard, John Wyman, Jack Hedley, James Villiers. Agent 007 is assigned to hunt for a lost British encryption device and prevent it from falling into enemy hands. Take out the silly prologue and epilogue and this is the straightest Bond for quite some time – and all the better for it. There are occasional lapses in pace and Moore is beginning to look a little old for the part, but the action sequences deliver excellent thrills. Bill Conti’s score, though, is the weakest of the series. Based on the short stories “For Your Eyes Only” and “Risico” by Ian Fleming. [PG]

imagesFrom Russia with Love (1963; UK; Technicolor; 115m) ∗∗∗∗  d. Terence Young; w. Richard Maibaum, Johanna Harwood; ph. Ted Moore; m. John Barry; ed. Peter R. Hunt.  Cast: Sean Connery, Daniela Bianchi, Pedro Armendáriz, Lotte Lenya, Robert Shaw, Bernard Lee, Eunice Gayson, Walter Gotell, Francis De Wolff, George Pastell, Nadja Regin, Lois Maxwell, Aliza Gur, Martine Beswick, Vladek Sheybal. James Bond willingly falls into an assassination ploy involving a naive Russian beauty in order to retrieve a Soviet encryption device that was stolen by SPECTRE. Second 007 film is a tense and well-made espionage thriller. The gadgets are still in the background here and Bond is left to his intelligence and his wits. Shaw makes an excellent heavy and Lenya is suitably creepy as Rosa Klebb. The production values are a notch up on DR. NO and the result is an exciting and action-packed adventure. Based on the novel by Ian Fleming. [PG]

download (4)GoldenEye (1995; UK/USA; Rankcolor; 130m) ∗∗∗½  d. Martin Campbell; w. Jeffrey Caine, Bruce Feirstein; ph. Phil Meheux; m. Eric Serra; ed. Terry Rawlings.  Cast: Pierce Brosnan, Sean Bean, Izabella Scorupco, Famke Janssen, Joe Don Baker, Judi Dench, Robbie Coltrane, Gottfried John, Alan Cumming, Tchéky Karyo, Desmond Llewelyn, Samantha Bond, Michael Kitchen, Serena Gordon, Simon Kunz. James Bond teams up with the lone survivor of a destroyed Russian research centre to stop the hijacking of a nuclear space weapon by a fellow agent believed to be dead. The plot may misfire occasionally but Brosnan’s debut outing is the best Bond for years. Well directed and with some exceptional action set-pieces. Janssen is sexy and psychoytic, but Bean lacks charisma as the villain. Based on a story by Michael France. [12]

Film Review – GOLD (1974)

GOLD (1974, Killarney Film Studios, UK, 120 mins, Colour, 2.35:1, Mono, Cert: 12, Action Drama) ∗∗∗∗∗
      Starring: Roger Moore (Rod Slater), Susannah York (Terry Steyner), Ray Milland (Hurry Hirschfeld), Bradford Dillman (Manfred Steyner), John Gielgud (Farrell), Tony Beckley (Stephen Marais), Simon Sabela (Big King), Marc Smith (Tex Kiernan), John Hussey (Plummer), Bernard Horsfall (Dave Kowalski), Bill Brewer (Aristide), Norman Coombes (Frank Lemmer).
      Producer: Michael Klinger; Director: Peter R. Hunt; Writer: Wilbur Smith, Stanley Price (based on the novel “Gold Mine” by Wilbur Smith); Director of Photography: Ousama Rawi (Technicolor); Music: Elmer Bernstein; Film Editor: John Glen; Production Designer: Syd Cain, Alex Vetchinsky, Art Director: Robert W. Laing; Costume Designer: Marjory Cornelius.

Gold_(1974)An overlooked film from the 1970s, this conspiracy action adventure story based on Wilbur Smith’s novel mixes exciting sequences underground with standard plotting and characters above it. Moore plays Rod Slater a mine manager who is set up as the fall guy by Dillman and his team of crooked investors. Their scheme is for Moore to flood the mine with water, whilst he believes he is drilling a new area for gold, and thereby raise the price of gold so Dillman and his crew can cash in.

Moore is excellent as Slater instilling more energy and emotion into the role than in his James Bond movies of the same vintage. In fact many of the Bond crew are on hand here. Peter Hunt, who directed one of the very best Bonds in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, livens the film with his trademark fast editing, supported by future Bond director John Glen, during the action scenes and significantly heightens the tension. The finale is particularly well staged as Moore and Sabela battle their way through the flooding mine in an attempt to seal it with explosives. The supporting cast is strong too with York good as Dillman’s wife and Moore’s love interest; Milland suitably grumpy as the mine owner and Dillman conniving as the director of operations. Gielgud, however, is wasted in a smaller role as the head of the investment syndicate.

With grippingly authentic and well filmed mining scenes making up for those above ground, which sometimes drag, this is a neat movie that deserves some re-appraisal.