Film Review – THE LONG GOOD FRIDAY (1980)

Long Good Friday, The (1980; UK; Colour; 114m) ∗∗∗∗½  d. John Mackenzie; w. Barrie Keeffe; ph. Phil Meheux; m. Francis Monkman.  Cast: Bob Hoskins, Helen Mirren, Eddie Constantine, Dave King, Bryan Marshall, Derek Thompson, Pierce Brosnan, George Coulouris, Paul Freeman, P.H. Moriarty, Daragh O’Malley, Alan Ford, Leo Dolan, Patti Love, Olivier Pierre. A prosperous English gangster, is about to close a lucrative new deal when bombs start showing up in very inconvenient places. British gangster thriller is powered by a charismatic performance from Hoskins and a classy one from Mirren. The tension builds as Hoskins begins to untangle the plot and the finale has one final twist to offer. Only the now dated electronic score by Monkman jars in this otherwise classic genre thriller. First theatrical film role for Pierce Brosnan. [18]

Film Review – DIE ANOTHER DAY (2002)

Die Another Day (2002; UK/USA; Colour; 133m) ∗∗  d. Lee Tamahori; w. Neal Purvis, Robert Wade; ph. David Tattersall; m. David Arnold.  Cast: Pierce Brosnan, Halle Berry, Toby Stephens, Rosamund Pike, Rick Yune, Judi Dench, John Cleese, Michael Madsen, Will Yun Lee, Kenneth Tsang, Emilio Echevarría, Mikhail Gorevoy, Lawrence Makoare, Colin Salmon, Samantha Bond, Madonna. James Bond is sent to investigate the connection between a North Korean terrorist and a diamond mogul who is funding the development of an international space weapon. After a strong first half this overblown adventure descends into some of the worst excesses seen in a Bond film since MOONRAKER – not least the invisible car. Berry is the film’s main asset in a lively turn, but a weak and increasingly unbelievable premise along with some appalling CGI ultimately sink the film. [12]

Film Review – THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH (1999)

World Is Not Enough, The (1999; UK/USA; Colour; 128m) ∗∗∗½  d. Michael Apted; w. Neal Purvis, Robert Wade, Bruce Feirstein; ph. Adrian Biddle; m. David Arnold.  Cast: Pierce Brosnan, Sophie Marceau, Robert Carlyle, Denise Richards, Robbie Coltrane, Judi Dench, Desmond Llewelyn, John Cleese, Maria Grazia Cucinotta, Samantha Bond, Michael Kitchen, Colin Salmon, Goldie, David Calder, Serena Scott Thomas. James Bond uncovers a nuclear plot when he protects an oil heiress from her former kidnapper, an international terrorist who can’t feel pain. A return to form with this outing having more depth than most recent Bonds. There is a better balance between plot development and action sequences. Brosnan gives his best performance as 007 and Marceau is excellent as the vulnerable heiress, whilst Carlyle makes an edgy villain. Richards, however, may be the least believable nuclear scientist in screen history. [12]

Film Review – TOMORROW NEVER DIES (1997)

Tomorrow Never Dies (1997; UK/USA; Colour; 119m) ∗∗∗  d. Roger Spottiswoode; w. Bruce Feirstein; ph. Robert Elswit; m. David Arnold.  Cast: Pierce Brosnan, Jonathan Pryce, Michelle Yeoh, Teri Hatcher, Ricky Jay, Götz Otto, Joe Don Baker, Vincent Schiavelli, Judi Dench, Desmond Llewelyn, Samantha Bond, Colin Salmon, Geoffrey Palmer, Julian Fellowes. James Bond heads to stop a media mogul’s plan to induce war between China and the UK in order to obtain exclusive global media coverage. Destruction and mayhem delivered through explosive action set-pieces take over at the expense of plot and a credible threat. Pryce hams it up as the chief villain and Brosnan already seems to be coasting on his charm as Bond. It’s all professionally packaged, but the heart seems to have gone out of the franchise. [12]

Film Review – GOLDENEYE (1995)

GoldenEye (1995; UK/USA; Rankcolor; 130m) ∗∗∗½  d. Martin Campbell; w. Jeffrey Caine, Bruce Feirstein; ph. Phil Meheux; m. Eric Serra.  Cast: Pierce Brosnan, Sean Bean, Izabella Scorupco, Famke Janssen, Joe Don Baker, Judi Dench, Robbie Coltrane, Gottfried John, Alan Cumming, Tchéky Karyo, Desmond Llewelyn, Samantha Bond, Michael Kitchen, Serena Gordon, Simon Kunz. James Bond teams up with the lone survivor of a destroyed Russian research centre to stop the hijacking of a nuclear space weapon by a fellow agent believed to be dead. The plot may misfire occasionally, but Brosnan’s debut outing as 007 is a big, bold adventure with the tried and trusted formula shaken but not stirred. Well directed and with some exceptional action set-pieces. Janssen is both sexy and psychotic, but Bean lacks charisma as the villain. Based on a story by Michael France. [12]

Film Review Round-up – Three more Bonds – FOR YOUR EYES ONLY (1981); FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE (1963) and GOLDENEYE (1995)

81947_largeFor Your Eyes Only (1981; UK; Technicolor; 127m) ∗∗∗½  d. John Glen; w. Richard Maibaum, Michael G. Wilson; ph. Alan Hume; m. Bill Conti; ed. John Grover.  Cast: Roger Moore, Carole Bouquet, Topol, Lois Maxwell, Lynn-Holly Johnson, Julian Glover, Jill Bennett, Desmond Llewelyn, Geoffrey Keen, Walter Gotell, Cassandra Harris, Michael Gothard, John Wyman, Jack Hedley, James Villiers. Agent 007 is assigned to hunt for a lost British encryption device and prevent it from falling into enemy hands. Take out the silly prologue and epilogue and this is the straightest Bond for quite some time – and all the better for it. There are occasional lapses in pace and Moore is beginning to look a little old for the part, but the action sequences deliver excellent thrills. Bill Conti’s score, though, is the weakest of the series. Based on the short stories “For Your Eyes Only” and “Risico” by Ian Fleming. [PG]

imagesFrom Russia with Love (1963; UK; Technicolor; 115m) ∗∗∗∗  d. Terence Young; w. Richard Maibaum, Johanna Harwood; ph. Ted Moore; m. John Barry; ed. Peter R. Hunt.  Cast: Sean Connery, Daniela Bianchi, Pedro Armendáriz, Lotte Lenya, Robert Shaw, Bernard Lee, Eunice Gayson, Walter Gotell, Francis De Wolff, George Pastell, Nadja Regin, Lois Maxwell, Aliza Gur, Martine Beswick, Vladek Sheybal. James Bond willingly falls into an assassination ploy involving a naive Russian beauty in order to retrieve a Soviet encryption device that was stolen by SPECTRE. Second 007 film is a tense and well-made espionage thriller. The gadgets are still in the background here and Bond is left to his intelligence and his wits. Shaw makes an excellent heavy and Lenya is suitably creepy as Rosa Klebb. The production values are a notch up on DR. NO and the result is an exciting and action-packed adventure. Based on the novel by Ian Fleming. [PG]

download (4)GoldenEye (1995; UK/USA; Rankcolor; 130m) ∗∗∗½  d. Martin Campbell; w. Jeffrey Caine, Bruce Feirstein; ph. Phil Meheux; m. Eric Serra; ed. Terry Rawlings.  Cast: Pierce Brosnan, Sean Bean, Izabella Scorupco, Famke Janssen, Joe Don Baker, Judi Dench, Robbie Coltrane, Gottfried John, Alan Cumming, Tchéky Karyo, Desmond Llewelyn, Samantha Bond, Michael Kitchen, Serena Gordon, Simon Kunz. James Bond teams up with the lone survivor of a destroyed Russian research centre to stop the hijacking of a nuclear space weapon by a fellow agent believed to be dead. The plot may misfire occasionally but Brosnan’s debut outing is the best Bond for years. Well directed and with some exceptional action set-pieces. Janssen is sexy and psychoytic, but Bean lacks charisma as the villain. Based on a story by Michael France. [12]

Film Review Round-up – Three Bonds – DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER (1971), DIE ANOTHER DAY (2002), DR. NO (1962)

poster_conceptDiamonds Are Forever (1971; UK; Technicolor; 120m) ∗∗∗  d. Guy Hamilton; w. Richard Maibaum, Tom Mankiewicz; ph. Ted Moore; m. John Barry; ed. Bert Bates, John W. Holmes.  Cast: Sean Connery, Jill St. John, Charles Gray, Lana Wood, Jimmy Dean, Bruce Cabot, Putter Smith, Bruce Glover, Norman Burton, Joseph Fürst, Bernard Lee, Desmond Llewelyn, Leonard Barr, Lois Maxwell, Margaret Lacey. A diamond smuggling investigation leads James Bond to Las Vegas, where he uncovers an extortion plot headed by his nemesis, Ernst Stavro Blofeld. Connery returns as Bond and the humour is played up at the expense of suspense. The film introduces a cartoonish feel that would dominate the series for more than a decade. Based on the novel by Ian Fleming. [PG]

Die-Another-Day-Movie-Poster-LargeDie Another Day (2002; UK/USA; Colour; 133m) ∗∗  d. Lee Tamahori; w. Neal Purvis, Robert Wade; ph. David Tattersall; m. David Arnold; ed. Andrew MacRitchie, Christian Wagner.  Cast: Pierce Brosnan, Halle Berry, Toby Stephens, Rosamund Pike, Rick Yune, Judi Dench, John Cleese, Michael Madsen, Will Yun Lee, Kenneth Tsang, Emilio Echevarría, Mikhail Gorevoy, Lawrence Makoare, Colin Salmon, Samantha Bond, Madonna. James Bond is sent to investigate the connection between a North Korean terrorist and a diamond mogul who is funding the development of an international space weapon. After a very strong first half this descends into some of the worst excesses seen in a Bond film since MOONRAKER. Berry is the films main asset in a lively turn, but some appalling CGI and a weak premise ultimately sink the film. [12]

dr-noDr. No (1962; UK; Technicolor; 110m) ∗∗∗∗  d. Terence Young; w. Richard Maibaum, Johanna Harwood, Berkely Mather; ph. Ted Moore; m. Monty Norman; ed. Peter R. Hunt.  Cast: Sean Connery, Ursula Andress, Joseph Wiseman, Jack Lord, Bernard Lee, Anthony Dawson, Zena Marshall, John Kitzmiller, Eunice Gayson, Lois Maxwell, Peter Burton. James Bond’s investigation of a missing colleague in Jamaica leads him to the island of the mysterious Dr. No and a scheme to end the US space program. First 007 film is a colourful adventure, if a little slow-moving by today’s standards. Connery eases into the role with style and Andress is stunning as the first Bond girl. Many of the elements are set here, but there is a simplicity to the production that remains endearing compared to later entries in the series. Great set designs by Ken Adam. Based on the novel by Ian Fleming. [PG]