TV Review – UNFORGOTTEN – SERIES 3 (2018)

Image result for unforgotten series 3Unforgotten – Series 3 (TV) (2018; UK; Colour; 6 x 47m) ****  pr. Guy de Glanville; d. Andy Wilson; w. Chris Lang; ph. Søren Bay; m. Michael Price.  Cast: Nicola Walker, Sanjeev Bhaskar, James Fleet, Alex Jennings, Kevin McNally, Neil Morrissey, Sasha Behar, Emma Fielding, Indra Ove, Amanda Root, Jordan Long, Lewis Reeves, Carolina Main, Peter Egan. Sara Stewart, Bronagh Waugh, Brid Brennan, Alastair MacKenzie, Tom Rhys Harries, Siobhan Redmond, Lucinda Dryzek, Jo Herbert.  When workmen carrying out carriageway repairs on the central reservation of the M1 uncover human remains, Cassie (Walker) and the team are called to investigate. The third series of Unforgotten maintains the high standard set by the first two. The formula is the same as before by setting up the discovery of a body and then lining up a number of inter-related suspects, all with their own secrets. In that respect it can perhaps be judged to be adding nothing new. However, the underlying story here has lots of resonance and a truly chilling finale. The cast is very strong and all deliver top-class performances, notably the quartet of suspects – Fleet, Jennings, McNally and Morrissey. Walker’s tics may be occasionally distracting, but she and Bhaskar continue to make for a likeable detective duo. Lang’s script is well balanced and maintains its mystery through to its dark finale and Wilson directs without needing to resort to the overly-stylised visuals so often used in  modern TV crime dramas. [15]

TV Review – COLLATERAL (2017)

Collateral (BBC) [DVD]Collateral (TV) (2017; UK; Colour; 4 x 60m) ***½  pr. Elizabeth Binns; d. S.J. Clarkson; w. David Hare; ph. Balazs Bolygo; m. Ruth Barrett. Cast:  Carey Mulligan, Jeany Spark, Nicola Walker, Nathaniel Martello-White, John Simm, Ahd, Billie Piper, Kae Alexander, Hayley Squires, July Namir, Ben Miles, Orla Brady, Rob Jarvis.  An employee of a pizza delivery service is gunned down on the street in a south London suburb after delivering a pizza to the ex-wife of the Shadow Minister for Transport. DI Kip Glaspie (Mulligan) is assigned to investigate the case leading her to uncovering an elaborate people smuggling operation. An impressive cast and a dark and witty script from Hare lift this above the average TV spy/detective fare. Mulligan delivers a very natural and believable performance, whilst Simm, as the MP the opposition party would rather forget, is excellent at conveying the positive side of a deeply flawed character, drawing the viewer’s sympathies and delivering some of the Hare’s best lines. Piper is biting as his ex-partner. Spark also scores as a soldier tainted by what she has witnessed on tour in Iraq. The spy business is put across less successfully and feels a little overplayed at times and the story lacks a clear resolution, but on the whole this is a well-acted and directed drama that offers up much to recommend, despite ultimately failing to fulfil expectations. [15]