Film Review – BEND OF THE RIVER (1952)

James Stewart and Julie Adams in Bend of the River (1952)BEND OF THE RIVER (USA, 1952) ****
      Distributor: Universal Pictures; Production Company: Universal International Pictures (UI); Release Date: 23 January 1952 (USA), 13 March 1952 (UK); Filming Dates: 26 July–13 September 1951; Running Time: 91m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono (Western Electric Recording); Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1; BBFC Cert: PG.
      Director: Anthony Mann; Writer: Borden Chase (based on the novel “Bend of the Snake” by William Gulick); Producer: Aaron Rosenberg; Associate Producer: Frank Cleaver; Director of Photography: Irving Glassberg; Music Composer: Hans J. Salter; Film Editor: Russell F. Schoengarth; Casting Director: Phil Benjamin (uncredited); Art Director: Bernard Herzbrun, Nathan Juran; Set Decorator: Oliver Emert, Russell A. Gausman; Costumes: Rosemary Odell; Make-up: Bud Westmore; Sound: Leslie I. Carey, Joe Lapis.
      Cast: James Stewart (Glyn McLyntock), Arthur Kennedy (Emerson Cole), Julie Adams (Laura Baile), Rock Hudson (Trey Wilson), Jay C. Flippen (Jeremy Baile), Lori Nelson (Marjie Baile), Chubby Johnson (Cap’n Mello), Stepin Fetchit (Adam), Harry Morgan (Shorty), Howard Petrie (Tom Hendricks), Frances Bavier (Mrs. Prentiss), Jack Lambert (Red), Royal Dano (Long Tom), Frank Chase (Wasco), Cliff Lyons (Willie), Frank Ferguson (Tom Grundy).
      Synopsis: When a town boss confiscates homesteader’s supplies after gold is discovered nearby, a tough cowboy risks his life to try and get it to them.
      Comment: James Stewart and director Anthony Mann team up for the second of five westerns they made together. The relatively simple tale is built around the complex characters of two former gunfighters (Stewart and Kennedy) attempting to distance themselves from their past as they fall in with a group of settlers led by Flippen. Adams plays Flippen’s daughter who is initially attracted to the more volatile Kennedy. Mann directs with a strong feel for the material and the characters and gets the best from his actors. The unforgiving landscapes and the glorious scenery are well captured by Glassberg’s cinematography. The story has a strong conclusion as Stewart and Kennedy go up against each other, demonstrating the different paths they have chosen. An early role for Hudson as a charming gambler.
      Notes: Original UK title: WHERE THE RIVER BENDS.

Film Review – REVENGE OF THE CREATURE (1955)

REVENGE OF THE CREATURE (USA, 1955) **½
      Distributor: Universal Pictures; Production Company: Universal International Pictures (UI); Release Date: 29 March 1955; Filming Dates: late Jun–early Aug 1954; Running Time: 82m; Colour: B&W; Sound Mix: Mono (Western Electric Recording); Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Universal 3-D (dual-strip 3-D); Aspect Ratio: 2.00:1; BBFC Cert: PG – mild violence, scary scenes.
      Director: Jack Arnold; Writer: Martin Berkeley (based on a story by William Alland); Producer: William Alland; Director of Photography: Scotty Welbourne; Music Composer: William Lava, Herman Stein (both uncredited); Music Supervisor: Joseph Gershenson; Film Editor: Paul Weatherwax; Art Director: Alexander Golitzen, Alfred Sweeney; Set Decorator: Russell A. Gausman, Julia Heron; Costumes: Jay A. Morley Jr.; Make-up: Bud Westmore; Sound: Jack A. Bolger Jr, Leslie I. Carey.
      Cast: John Agar (Professor Clete Ferguson), Lori Nelson (Helen Dobson), John Bromfield (Joe Hayes), Nestor Paiva (Lucas), Grandon Rhodes (Jackson Foster), Dave Willock (Lou Gibson), Robert B. Williams (George Johnson), Charles Cane (Captain of Police).
      Synopsis: The Creature from the Black Lagoon is back! This time he’s captured by scientists and transported to an aquarium in south Florida.
      Comment: Sequel to CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON (1954) follows genre convention by having the creature (the Gill Man) taken from its natural habitat (the Amazon) to be exhibited at a sea life centre in Florida. There professor Agar and student Nelson study the creature and try to assess its level of intelligence. Of course, the creature escapes and mayhem ensues. There are some well-shot scenes that stand out as individual moments, but once the creature is on the rampage the film descends into routine thrills and chills. Agar is pretty wooden as the male lead, but Nelson is appealing. The finale is something of a let down in its swiftness of resolution.
      Notes: Look for a young, uncredited Clint Eastwood in his first screen appearance as a goofy lab assistant. Also shot in 3-D. Followed by THE CREATURE WALKS AMONG US (1956).