TV Review – CRACKER: BEST BOYS (1995)

Image result for cracker best boysCRACKER: BEST BOYS (TV) (UK, 1995) ***½
      Distributor: ITV – Independent Television; Production Company: A&E Television Networks / Granada Television; Release Date: 6 & 13 November 1995; Running Time: 99m; Colour: Colour; Sound Mix: Dolby Stereo; Film Format: 16mm; Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1; BBFC Cert: 15.
      Director: Charles McDougall; Writer: Paul Abbott; Executive Producer: Sally Head; Producer: Hilary Bevan Jones; Director of Photography: Dick Dodd; Music Composer: Rick Wentworth; Film Editor: Tony Cranstoun; Casting Director: Marilyn Johnson; Production Designer: Stephen Fineren; Art Director: Bill Crutcher; Wardrobe Supervisor: Michael Richards; Make-up: Anastasia Shirley; Sound: Phil Smith.
      Cast: Robbie Coltrane (Fitz), Barbara Flynn (Judith Fitzgerald), Geraldine Somerville (D.S. Penhaligon), Ricky Tomlinson (D.C.I. Wise), Liam Cunningham (Grady), John Simm (Bill), Robert Cavanah (D.C. Temple), Wil Johnson (D.C. Skelton), Clive Russell (Danny Fitzgerald), Annette Ekblom (Diane Nash), John Langford (Brian Nash), Edward Peel (Chief Superintendent), Kieran O’Brien (Mark), Tess Thomson (Katie), Paul Barber (Ian McVerry), Will Knightley (Pathologist).
      Synopsis: Stuart Grady, a lonely factory foreman, befriends a young male employee and the disturbed runaway involves them both in murder.
      Comment: The second story of the final full season of Cracker is written by Paul Abbott (later famous for creating the TV series Shameless). Whilst Abbott fashions another solid psychological crime drama, he dumbs down some of the detective work with most of Fitz’s deductions requiring a substantial leap of faith. The strength of the show lies in its excellent performances and this story is well served by a very strong cast – with Cunningham and Simm particularly notable in early roles. The finale drops back into genre convention and the scene’s climax is predictably shocking. Technical credits are strong with Wentworth’s moody score adding to the atmosphere.

TV Review – COLLATERAL (2017)

Collateral (BBC) [DVD]Collateral (TV) (2017; UK; Colour; 4 x 60m) ***½  pr. Elizabeth Binns; d. S.J. Clarkson; w. David Hare; ph. Balazs Bolygo; m. Ruth Barrett. Cast:  Carey Mulligan, Jeany Spark, Nicola Walker, Nathaniel Martello-White, John Simm, Ahd, Billie Piper, Kae Alexander, Hayley Squires, July Namir, Ben Miles, Orla Brady, Rob Jarvis.  An employee of a pizza delivery service is gunned down on the street in a south London suburb after delivering a pizza to the ex-wife of the Shadow Minister for Transport. DI Kip Glaspie (Mulligan) is assigned to investigate the case leading her to uncovering an elaborate people smuggling operation. An impressive cast and a dark and witty script from Hare lift this above the average TV spy/detective fare. Mulligan delivers a very natural and believable performance, whilst Simm, as the MP the opposition party would rather forget, is excellent at conveying the positive side of a deeply flawed character, drawing the viewer’s sympathies and delivering some of the Hare’s best lines. Piper is biting as his ex-partner. Spark also scores as a soldier tainted by what she has witnessed on tour in Iraq. The spy business is put across less successfully and feels a little overplayed at times and the story lacks a clear resolution, but on the whole this is a well-acted and directed drama that offers up much to recommend, despite ultimately failing to fulfil expectations. [15]

TV Review – DOCTOR WHO: WORLD ENOUGH AND TIME / THE DOCTOR FALLS (2017)

Image result for doctor who world enough and time the doctor fallsDoctor Who: World Enough and Time / The Doctor Falls (TV) (2017: UK: Colour: 106m) ∗∗∗∗½  pr. Peter Bennett; d. Rachel Talalay; w. Steven Moffat; ph. Ashley Rowe; m. Murray Gold. Cast: Peter Capaldi, Matt Lucas, Pearl Mackie , Michelle Gomez, John Simm , Oliver Lansley, Paul Brightwell, Alison Lintott, Briana Shann, Rosie Boore, Samantha Spiro, Simon Coombs, Nicholas Briggs, David Bradley.   Friendship drives the Doctor into the rashest decision of his life. Trapped on a giant spaceship, caught in the event horizon of a black hole, he witnesses the death of someone he is pledged to protect. Is there any way he can redeem his mistake? Are events already out of control? For once, time is the Time Lord’s enemy. Moffat’s season finales have generally been a case of excellent set-up and disappointing pay-off. This story comes close to meeting that trend, but ultimately wins out because of the superb performances, a witty script and its no-win situation. Capaldi excels here in fighting his moral dilemna. Gomez and Simm spark well with Capaldi and each other and there is a sense of irony about the resolution of their story.  The first episode set up the premise brilliantly in one of the best ever episodes of the series. The resolution felt a little contrived in places and overly sentimental in the resolution of Bill’s story, but this is otherwise an excellent finale with a superb twist right at the end leaving us looking forward to the Xmas special to come. [12]