TV Review – RAWHIDE – SEASON 8 (1965)

rawhide cast | TV ACRES: Westerns > Rawhide (starring Eric Fleming ...RAWHIDE – SEASON 8 (USA, 1965) ***½
      Distributor/Production Company: CBS Television Network; Broadcast Dates: 14 September – 7 December 1965; Running Time: 13 x 50m; Colour: B&W; Sound Mix: Mono; Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1; BBFC Cert: PG.
      Executive Producer: Ben Brady; Producer: Robert E. Thompson; Associate Producer: Robert Stillman.
      Cast: Clint Eastwood (Rowdy Yates), Paul Brinegar (Wishbone), Steve Raines (Jim Quince), John Ireland (Jed Colby), Raymond St. Jacques (Simon Blake), David Watson (Ian Cabot).
      Episodes: Encounter at Boot Hill / Ride a Crooked Mile / Six Weeks to Bent Fork / Walk Into Terror / Escort to Doom / Hostage for Hanging / The Vasquez Woman / Clash at Broken Bluff / The Pursuit / Duel at Daybreak / Brush War at Buford / The Testing Post / Crossing at White Feather
      Synopsis: Rowdy Yates is trail boss of a continuous cattle drive. He and his crew runs into characters and adventures along the way.
      Comment: The final season of Rawhide was curtailed to thriteen episodes. Ratings had been on the wane in the previous two seasons and Eric Fleming, who played trail boss Gil Favor, had left the series at the end of season 7 following a dispute on pay. That meant Clint Eastwood was promoted to trail boss. Eastwood by now had filmed the first two of his Italian westerns with Sergio Leone. It is interesting to note that his new found big screen persona began to crossover into his Rowdy Yates character, who is tougher and more mature here. Eastwood’s sqint and laconic approach are in evidence. Despite the flagging viewing figures and loss of the lead actor, the quality of the episodes remained high with some notable guest turns (Simon Oakland, Jeff Cory, Charles Bronson, James Gregory, Bruce Dern, Claude Akins, Rip Torn, Warren Oates, Cesar Romero, Ralph Bellamy, Rory Calhoun). Standout episodes include: Encounter at Boot Hill (stylishly directed by Sutton Roley); Six Weeks to Bent Fork; Walk into Terror; Duel at Daybreak (with Bronson in great form as a sadistic ranch hand). Eastwood can be seen as a much more confident lead than playing second fiddle and he would soon be catapulted to stardom on the back of his third Spaghetti Western, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

Film Review – RED RIVER (1948)

Red River (1948 film) movie scenesRed River (1948; USA; B&W; 133m) ****½  d. Howard Hawks, Arthur Rosson; w. Borden Chase, Charles Schnee; ph. Russell Harlan; m. Dimitri Tiomkin.  Cast: John Wayne, Montgomery Clift, Walter Brennan, Joanne Dru, Coleen Gray, John Ireland, Noah Beery Jr., Harry Carey, Harry Carey Jr., Paul Fix, Chief Yowlachie, Hank Worden, Mickey Kuhn, Hal Taliaferro, Shelley Winters. A rancher is driving his cattle to Red River when his adopted son turns against him. Wayne is excellent in an unsympathetic role as the trail boss. Clift and Brennan are just as good in support. The photography captures the toughness of a long cattle drive and Tiomkin contributes a memorable score. Hawks handles the story perfectly through to its finale, which strikes the only false note in an otherwise top-class production. Filmed in 1946 but held for release for two years, in part due to legal problems with Howard Hughes who claimed it was similar to his THE OUTLAW. Borden adapted his own story. Remade for TV in 1988. [PG]