TV Review – CRACKER: THE BIG CRUNCH (1994)

Cracker (UK) - 02x04 The Big Crunch (1)CRACKER: THE BIG CRUNCH (TV) (UK, 1994) ***½
Distributor: ITV – Independent Television; Production Company: A&E Television Networks / Granada Television; Release Date: 31 October, 7 & 14 November 1994; Running Time: 147m; Colour: Colour; Sound Mix: Dolby Stereo; Film Format: 16mm; Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1; BBFC Cert: 18.
      Director: Julian Jarrold; Writer: Ted Whitehead; Executive Producer: Sally Head; Producer: Paul Abbott; Director of Photography: Ivan Strasburg; Music Composer: David Ferguson; Film Editor: Oral Norrie Ottey; Casting Director: Gail Stevens; Production Designer: Claire Kenny; Art Director: Chris Coldwell; Sound: Chris Coldwell.
Cast: Robbie Coltrane (Fitz), Barbara Flynn (Judith Fitzgerald), Geraldine Somerville (D.S. Penhaligon), Lorcan Cranitch (D.S. Beck), Ricky Tomlinson (D.C.I. Wise), Jim Carter (Kenneth Trant), Cherith Mellor (Norma Trant), Maureen O’Brien (Virginia Trant), Samantha Morton (Joanna Barnes), James Fleet (Michael Trant), Darren Tighe (Dean Saunders), Roger Sloman (Mr Barnes), Ellie Haddington (Mrs Barnes), Colin Tierney (Harriman), Kieran O’Brien (Mark), Emma Cunniffe (Sarah Jennings), Nicholas Blane (Father O’Ryan), Tess Thomson (Katie).
Synopsis: A young girl missing for several days is discovered naked, covered in strange symbols and quoting the Bible. The trail leads to a fringe Christian sect and its charismatic leader, Kenneth Trant.
Comment: Fifth story in the Cracker series is the first not to be written by Jimmy McGovern. The setting switches from the inner-city working-class to middle-class suburbia. The story’s focus on religious hypocrisy is a little heavy-handed with its denouement seeming contrived and unconvincing. The strengths of the production lie in the performances of its strong cast, notably Morton as the young girl besotted with Carter’s sect leader. Coltrane is as captivating as ever as Fitz, whose verbal sparring with Tomlinson’s chief of detectives is one of the highlights.

TV Review – UNFORGOTTEN – SERIES 3 (2018)

Image result for unforgotten series 3Unforgotten – Series 3 (TV) (2018; UK; Colour; 6 x 47m) ****  pr. Guy de Glanville; d. Andy Wilson; w. Chris Lang; ph. Søren Bay; m. Michael Price.  Cast: Nicola Walker, Sanjeev Bhaskar, James Fleet, Alex Jennings, Kevin McNally, Neil Morrissey, Sasha Behar, Emma Fielding, Indra Ove, Amanda Root, Jordan Long, Lewis Reeves, Carolina Main, Peter Egan. Sara Stewart, Bronagh Waugh, Brid Brennan, Alastair MacKenzie, Tom Rhys Harries, Siobhan Redmond, Lucinda Dryzek, Jo Herbert.  When workmen carrying out carriageway repairs on the central reservation of the M1 uncover human remains, Cassie (Walker) and the team are called to investigate. The third series of Unforgotten maintains the high standard set by the first two. The formula is the same as before by setting up the discovery of a body and then lining up a number of inter-related suspects, all with their own secrets. In that respect it can perhaps be judged to be adding nothing new. However, the underlying story here has lots of resonance and a truly chilling finale. The cast is very strong and all deliver top-class performances, notably the quartet of suspects – Fleet, Jennings, McNally and Morrissey. Walker’s tics may be occasionally distracting, but she and Bhaskar continue to make for a likeable detective duo. Lang’s script is well balanced and maintains its mystery through to its dark finale and Wilson directs without needing to resort to the overly-stylised visuals so often used in  modern TV crime dramas. [15]