Film Review – THE DEAD POOL (1988)

Image result for the dead pool 1988THE DEAD POOL (USA, 1988) ***
      Distributor: Warner Bros. Pictures; Production Company: Warner Bros. Pictures / Malpaso Productions; Release Date: 13 July 1988 (USA), 14 April 1989 (UK); Filming Dates: 17 February – March 1988; Running Time: 91m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Dolby Stereo (4 channels) | Dolby Digital (5.1); Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1; BBFC Cert: 18.
      Director: Buddy Van Horn; Writer: Steve Sharon (based on a story by Steve Sharon, Durk Pearson and Sandy Shaw and characters created by Harry Julian Fink and Rita M. Fink); Producer: David Valdes; Director of Photography: Jack N. Green; Music Composer: Lalo Schifrin; Film Editor: Ron Spang; Casting Director: Phyllis Huffman; Production Designer: Edward C. Carfagno; Set Decorator: Thomas L. Roysden; Costumes: Glenn Wright, Deborah Hopper; Make-up: Monty Westmore; Sound: Richard S. Church; Special Effects: Joe Day, Bob Finley III, Chuck Gaspar, Thomas Mertz, Bruce Robles.
      Cast: Clint Eastwood (Harry Callahan), Patricia Clarkson (Samantha Walker), Liam Neeson (Peter Swan), Evan C. Kim (Al Quan), David Hunt (Harlan Rook), Michael Currie (Captain Donnelly), Michael Goodwin (Lt. Ackerman), Darwin Gillett (Patrick Snow), Anthony Charnota (Lou Janero), Christopher P. Beale (D.A. Thomas McSherry), John Vick (Lt. Ruskowski), Jeff Richmond (Freeway Reporter #1), Patrick N. Van Horn (Freeway Reporter #2), Sigrid Wurschmidt (Freeway Reporter #3), Jim Carrey (Johnny Squares), Deborah A. Bryan (Girl in Rock Video), Nicholas Love (Jeff Howser), Maureen McVerry (Vicky Owens), John X. Heart (Samantha’s Cameraman), Victoria Bastel (Suzanne Dayton), Kathleen Turco-Lyon (Officer at Trailer), Michael Faqir (Sergeant at Trailer), Ronnie Claire Edwards (Molly Fisher), Wallace Choy (Chinese Store Manager), Melodie Soe (Chinese Restaurant Hostess), Kristopher Logan (Gunman #1), Scott Vance (Gunman #2), Glenn Wright (Detective Hindmark), Stu Klitsner (Minister), Karen Kahn (T.V. Associate Producer), Shawn Elliott (Chester Docksteder), Ren Reynolds (Perry), Ed Hodson (Paramedic at Elevator), Edward Hocking (Warden Hocking), Diego Chairs (Butcher Hicks), Patrick Valentino (Pirate Captain), Calvin Jones (Pirate Tug Reporter #1), Melissa Martin (Pirate Tug Reporter #2), Phil Dacey (Detective Dacey), Louis Giambalvo (Gus Wheeler), Peter Anthony Jacobs (Sgt. Holloway), Bill Wattenburg (Nolan Kennard), Hugh McCann (Young Man on Talkshow), Suzanne Sterling (Young Woman on Talkshow), Lloyd Nelson (Sgt. Waldman), Charles Martinet (Police Station Reporter #1), Taylor Gilbert (Police Station Reporter #2), George Orrison (Embarcadero Bodyguard #1), Marc Alaimo (Embarcadero Bodyguard #2), Justin Whalin (Jason), Kris LeFan (Carl), Katie Bruce (Girl on Sidewalk), Harry Demopoulos (Doctor in Hospital Room), John Frederick Jones (Dr. Friedman), Martin Ganapoler (Reporter at Pier).
      Synopsis: Dirty Harry Callahan must stop a sick secret contest to murder local celebrities, which includes himself as a target.
      Comment: Fifth and final DIRTY HARRY movie is an outlandish but watchable thriller coasting on Eastwood’s star presence. The plot is far-fetched, including a great set-piece with a toy car carrying a bomb. Clarkson is a reporter out to get the story who falls in with Eastwood.  Carrey grabs attention as a junkie rock star, whilst Neeson is seen in an early role as a self-obsessed film director. It all adds up to a comic book action thriller, but a diverting time for undemanding viewers.
      Notes: Song: “Welcome to the Jungle,” written by Slash, W. Axl Rose, Steven Adler, Izzy Stradlin and Duff Rose McKageh, performed by Guns N’ Roses, courtesy of Geffen Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products.

Film Review – SUDDEN IMPACT (1983)

Image result for sudden impact 1983SUDDEN IMPACT (USA, 1983) ***
      Distributor: Warner Bros. Pictures; Production Company: Warner Bros. Pictures / The Malpaso Company; Release Date: 8 December 1983 (USA), 27 January 1984 (UK); Filming Dates: 3 May 1983; Running Time: 117m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono | Dolby Digital (5.1); Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Panavision; Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1; BBFC Cert: 18.
      Director: Clint Eastwood; Writer: Joseph Stinson (based on a story by Earl E. Smith & Charles B. Pierce and characters created by Harry Julian Fink and Rita M. Fink); Executive Producer: Fritz Manes; Producer: Clint Eastwood; Associate Producer: Steve Perry; Director of Photography: Bruce Surtees; Music Composer: Lalo Schifrin; Film Editor: Joel Cox; Casting Director: Marion Dougherty; Production Designer: Edward C. Carfagno; Set Decorator: Ernie Bishop; Costumes: Glenn Wright; Make-up: Barbara Guedel; Sound: Bub Asman, Alan Robert Murray, Donald F. Johnson; Special Effects: Chuck Gaspar.
      Cast: Clint Eastwood (Harry Callahan), Sondra Locke (Jennifer Spencer), Pat Hingle (Chief Jannings), Bradford Dillman (Captain Briggs), Paul Drake (Mick), Audrie Neenan (Ray Parkins), Jack Thibeau (Kruger), Michael Currie (Lt. Donnelly), Albert Popwell (Horace King), Mark Keyloun (Officer Bennett), Kevyn Major Howard (Hawkins), Bette Ford (Leah), Nancy Parsons (Mrs. Kruger), Joe Bellan (Burly Detective), Wendell Wellman (Tyrone), Mara Corday (Loretta – Coffee Shop Waitress), Russ McCubbin (Eddie), Robert Sutton (Carl), Nancy Fish (Historical Society Woman), Carmen Argenziano (D’Ambrosia), Lisa Britt (Elizabeth), Bill Reddick (Police Commissioner), Lois De Banzie (Judge), Matthew Child (Alby), Mike Johnson (Assassin), Nick Dimitri (Assassin), Michael Maurer (George Wilburn), Pat DuVal (Bailiff), Christian Phillips (Hawkin’s Crony), Steven Kravitz (Hawkin’s Crony), Dennis Royston (Young Guy), Melvin Thompson (Young Guy), Jophery C. Brown (Young Guy), William Upton (Young Guy), Lloyd Nelson (Desk Sergeant), Christopher Pray (Detective Jacobs), James McEachin (Detective Barnes), Maria Lynch (Hostess), Ken Lee (Loomis), Morgan Upton (Bartender), John X. Heart (Uniform Policeman), David Gonzales (Gang Member), Albert Martinez (Gang Member), David Rivers (Gang Member), Robert Rivers (Gang Member), Harry Demopoulos (Dr. Barton), Lisa London (Young Hooker), Tom Spratley (Senior Man), Eileen Wiggins (Hysterical Female Customer), John Nowak (Bank Robber).
      Synopsis: A rape victim is taking revenge on her aggressors in a small town outside San Francisco. Inspector Harry Callahan (Eastwood), on suspension for angering his superiors (again), is assigned to the case.
      Comment: Fourth DIRTY HARRY film is heavy-handed, but entertaining nonetheless. The action has become more violent and cartoonish with the set pieces also increasingly formulaic, but Eastwood’s screen presence is more than enough to carry the movie. Eastwood directs efficiently and the only real weakness is a by-the-numbers script. Locke gives a good portrayal of the victim exacting revenge on her attackers.
      Notes: The screenplay was originally written for a non-Dirty Harry film with Sondra Locke. However, the script, by Earl E. Smith and Charles B. Pierce, was later re-written by Joseph Stinson into this Dirty Harry movie. Fourth in the series following DIRTY HARRY (1971), MAGNUM FORCE (1973) and THE ENFORCER (1976) and followed by THE DEAD POOL (1989).

Film Review – MAGNUM FORCE (1973)

Image result for magnum force 1973MAGNUM FORCE (USA, 1973) ***
      Distributor: Warner Bros. Pictures (USA), Columbia-Warner Distributors (UK); Production Company: The Malpaso Company; Release Date: 25 December 1973 (USA), 26 December 1973 (UK); Filming Dates: 24 April–late June 1973; Running Time: 124m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono; Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Panavision; Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1; BBFC Cert: 18.
      Director: Ted Post; Writer: John Milius, Michael Cimino (based on a story by John Milius and original material by Harry Julian Fink and Rita M. Fink); Producer: Robert Daley; Director of Photography: Frank Stanley; Music Composer: Lalo Schifrin; Film Editor: Ferris Webster; Casting Director: Nessa Hyams (uncredited); Art Director: Jack T. Collis; Set Decorator: John Lamphear; Costumes: Glenn Wright; Make-up: Joe McKinney; Sound: James R. Alexander; Special Effects: Sass Bedig.
      Cast: Clint Eastwood (Harry Callahan), Hal Holbrook (Lt. Briggs), Mitchell Ryan (McCoy), David Soul (Davis), Tim Matheson (Sweet), Kip Niven (Astrachan), Robert Urich (Grimes), Felton Perry (Early Smith), Maurice Argent (Nat Weinstein), Margaret Avery (Prostitute), Richard Devon (Ricca), Tony Giorgio (Palancio), Jack Kosslyn (Walter), Bob March (Estabrook), Bob McClurg (Cab Driver), John Mitchum (DiGiorgio), Russ Moro (Ricca’s Driver), Clifford A. Pellow (Guzman), Albert Popwell (Pimp), Christine White (Carol McCoy), Adele Yoshioka (Sunny).
      Synopsis: Eastwood’s Inspector Harry Callahan is on the trail of vigilante cops who are not above going beyond the law to kill the city’s undesirables.
      Comment: Sequel to DIRTY HARRY lacks the style and efficiency of the original, suffering from a sluggish pace at times. However, the set pieces are well-handled and Eastwood commands the screen in his signature role with much to enjoy in his verbal jousts with immediate superior Holbrook. Soul also makes an impression in an early career appearance as one of a group of four rookie cops, which also include Urich, Niven and Matheson. The story would have benefited from tighter editing – alterations and additions had been made to Milius’ original script adding some filler and unnecessary scenes. Schifrin’s memorable propulsive score riffs on his similar work on the first film.
      Notes: Suzanne Somers makes an uncredited appearance as one of the victims in the pool scene early in the film. Film debut of Urich. Second of five films in the series and followed by THE ENFORCER (1976), SUDDEN IMPACT (1983) and THE DEAD POOL (1988).

Film Review – DIRTY HARRY (1971)

Image result for dirty harry 1971DIRTY HARRY (USA, 1971) ****½
      Distributor: Warner Bros. Pictures (US), Columbia-Warner Distributors (UK); Production Company: The Malpaso Company; Release Date: 21 December 1971 (USA), 30 March 1972 (UK); Filming Dates: 20 April 1971 – 18 June 1971; Running Time: 102m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono; Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Panavision; Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1; BBFC Cert: 15- contains strong violence.
       Director: Don Siegel; Writer: Harry Julian Fink & Rita M. Fink, and Dean Riesner (based on a story by Harry Julian Fink & Rita M. Fink); Executive Producer: Robert Daley; Producer: Don Siegel; Associate Producer: Carl Pingitore; Director of Photography: Bruce Surtees; Music Composer: Lalo Schifrin; Film Editor: Carl Pingitore; Casting Director: ; Art Director: Dale Hennesy; Set Decorator: Robert De Vestel; Costumes: Glenn Wright; Make-up: Gordon Bau; Sound: William Randall.
       Cast: Clint Eastwood (Harry), Harry Guardino (Bressler), Reni Santoni (Chico), John Vernon (The Mayor), Andrew Robinson (Killer), John Larch (Chief), John Mitchum (De Giorgio), Mae Mercer (Mrs. Russell), Lyn Edgington (Norma), Ruth Kobart (Bus Driver), Woodrow Parfrey (Mr. Jaffe), Josef Sommer (Rothko), William Paterson (Bannerman), James Nolan (Liquor Proprietor), Maurice Argent (Sid Kleinman), Jo de Winter (Miss Willis), Craig Kelly (Sgt. Reineke).
       Synopsis: When a mad man calling himself ‘the Scorpio Killer’ menaces the city, tough as nails San Francisco Police Inspector Harry Callahan is assigned to track down and ferret out the crazed psychopath.
      Comment: Classic renegade cop movie was highly Influential and redefined the crime genre for a new generation. Siegel directs an efficient and effective crime thriller in which Eastwood established the blueprint for all maverick cop characters that followed. Much maligned by liberal critics at the time for its approach, it has since grown significantly in reputation for its lean script and Eastwood’s career-defining performance. Robinson is also excellent as the psychotic serial killer. The cat-and-mouse nature of the plot is well realised and leads to a tense finale. The screenplay contains much quotable dialogue and adds depth to the characters as well as addressing its broader message. There is a dynamite jazz-rock music score from Schifrin, which adds significantly to the movie’s style.
      Notes: Serial killer Scorpio was loosely based on the Zodiac killer, who used to taunt police and media with notes about his crimes, in one of which he threatened to hijack a school bus full of children. This was Josef Sommer’s first film. The first of five movies starring Eastwood as Inspector “Dirty” Harry Callahan. Followed by MAGNUM FORCE (1973), THE ENFORCER (1976), SUDDEN IMPACT (1983) and THE DEAD POOL (1988).

Film Review – THE DEAD POOL (1988)

Dead Pool, The (1988; USA; Technicolor; 91m) ∗∗∗  d. Buddy Van Horn; w. Steve Sharon; ph. Jack N. Green; m. Lalo Schifrin.  Cast: Clint Eastwood, Patricia Clarkson, Liam Neeson, Evan C. Kim, David Hunt, Michael Currie, Michael Goodwin, Jim Carrey, Louis Giambalvo, Darwin Gillett, Anthony Charnota, Christopher P. Beale, John Allen Vick, Jeff Richmond, Sigrid Wurschmidt. Dirty Harry Callahan must stop a sick secret contest to murder local celebrities, which includes himself as a target. Fifth and final DIRTY HARRY movie is a watchable thriller coasting on Eastwood’s star presence. Plot is far-fetched, but there is a great set-piece with a toy car carrying a bomb. Carrey as a junkie rock star grabs attention, whilst Neeson is seen in an early role. Based on a story by Steve Sharon, Durk Pearson, Sandy Shaw and characters created by Harry Julian Fink and Rita M. Fink. [18]

Film Review – SUDDEN IMPACT (1983)

Sudden Impact (1983; USA; Technicolor; 117m) ∗∗∗  d. Clint Eastwood; w. Joseph Stinson; ph. Bruce Surtees; m. Lalo Schifrin. Cast: Clint Eastwood, Sondra Locke, Pat Hingle, Bradford Dillman, Audrie J. Neenan, Jack Thibeau, Nancy Parsons, Mara Corday, Michael Currie, Mark Keyloun, Albert Popwell, Bette Ford, Joe Bellan, Paul Drake, Kevyn Major Howard. A rape victim is exacting revenge on her aggressors in a small town outside San Francisco. Inspector Harry Callahan (Eastwood), on suspension for angering his superiors (again), is assigned to the case. Fourth DIRTY HARRY film is heavy handed, but entertaining nonetheless. The action has become more violent and cartoonish with the set pieces formulaic, but Eastwood’s screen presence is more than enough to carry the movie. Based on a story by Earl E. Smith & Charles B. Pierce. Followed by THE DEAD POOL (1989). [18]

Film Review – THE ENFORCER (1976)

Enforcer, The (1976; USA; Technicolor; 96m) ∗∗∗½  d. James Fargo; w. Stirling Silliphant, Dean Riesner; ph. Charles W. Short; m. Jerry Fielding.  Cast: Clint Eastwood, Tyne Daly, Harry Guardino, John Mitchum, Bradford Dillman, John Crawford, Robert F. Hoy, Rudy Ramos, DeVeren Bookwalter, Samantha Doane, Jocelyn Jones, M.G. Kelly, Nick Pellegrino, Albert Popwell, Rudy Ramos. Eastwood’s Inspector Harry Callahan must foil a terrorist organization made up of disgruntled Vietnam veterans. But this time, he’s teamed with a rookie female partner that he’s not too excited to be working with. Third DIRTY HARRY film is a slick affair. Most of the fun is derived from the interplay between Eastwood, at his charismatic best, and Daly, who is excellent in her first major role. There is also a fine shoot-out finale on Alcatraz. Based on a story by Gail Morgan Hickman and S.W. Schurr. Followed by SUDDEN IMPACT (1983). [18]

Film Review – MAGNUM FORCE (1973)

Magnum Force (1973; USA; Technicolor; 124m) ∗∗∗  d. Ted Post; w. John Milius, Michael Cimino; ph. Frank Stanley; m. Lalo Schifrin.  Cast: Clint Eastwood, Hal Holbrook, David Soul, Robert Urich, Mitch Ryan, Felton Perry, Tim Matheson, Margaret Avery, Kip Niven, Christine White, Maurice Argent, Richard Devon, Tony Giorgio, Jack Kosslyn, Bob McClurg. Eastwood’s Inspector Harry Callahan is on the trail of vigilante cops who are not above going beyond the law to kill the city’s undesirables. Sequel to DIRTY HARRY lacks the punch of the original and suffers from a sluggish pace at times. However, the set pieces are well-handled by experienced director Post and Eastwood commands the screen in his signature role. Soul makes an impression in an early career appearance. Film debut of Urich. Followed by THE ENFORCER (1976). [18]

Film Review – DIRTY HARRY (1971)

Dirty Harry (1971; USA; Technicolor; 102m) ∗∗∗∗½  d. Don Siegel; w. Harry Julian Fink, Rita M. Fink, Dean Riesner; ph. Bruce Surtees; m. Lalo Schifrin.  Cast: Clint Eastwood, Harry Guardino, John Mitchum, Reni Santoni, Andrew Robinson, John Larch, John Vernon, Josef Sommer, Woodrow Parfrey, Mae Mercer, Lyn Edgington, Woodrow Parfrey, William Paterson, Maurice Argent. When a mad man calling himself ‘the Scorpio Killer’ menaces the city, tough as nails San Francisco Police Inspector Harry Callahan is assigned to track down and ferret out the crazed psychopath. Influential, efficient and effective crime thriller with Eastwood establishing the blueprint for all maverick cop characters that followed. Siegel handles it all with style. Dynamite jazz rock music score from Schifrin. Sommer’s first film. The first of five movies starring Eastwood as Inspector “Dirty” Harry Callahan. Followed by MAGNUM FORCE (1973). [18]