Film Review – QUATERMASS AND THE PIT (1967)

QUATERMASS AND THE PIT (UK, 1967) ****
PRODUCTION: Distributor: Warner-Pathé Distributors (UK), Twentieth Century Fox (USA); Production Company: Hammer Film Productions; Release Date: 29 September 1967 (UK), 7 February 1968 (USA); Filming Dates: 27 February 1967 – 25 April 1967; Running Time: 97m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono (RCA Sound Recording); Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1; BBFC Cert: 12.
CREW: Director: Roy Ward Baker; Writer: Nigel Kneale (based on an original story by Nigel Kneale); Producer: Anthony Nelson Keys; Director of Photography: Arthur Grant; Music Composer: Tristram Cary; Music Supervisor: Philip Martell; Film Editor: James Needs; Casting Director: Irene Lamb; Art Director: Kenneth Ryan; Costumes: Rosemary Burrows; Make-up: Michael Morris; Sound: Sash Fisher, Roy Hyde; Special Effects: Les Bowie, Sydney Pearson.
CAST: James Donald (Doctor Roney), Andrew Keir (Quatermass), Barbara Shelley (Barbara Judd), Julian Glover (Colonel Breen), Duncan Lamont (Sladden), Bryan Marshall (Captain Potter), Peter Copley (Howell), Edwin Richfield (Minister), Grant Taylor (Police Sergeant Ellis), Maurice Good (Sergeant Cleghorn), Robert Morris (Watson), Sheila Steafel (Journalist), Hugh Futcher (Sapper West), Hugh Morton (Elderly Journalist), Thomas Heathcote (Vicar), Noel Howlett (Abbey Librarian), Hugh Manning (Pub Customer), June Ellis (Blonde), Keith Marsh (Johnson), James Culliford (Corporal Gibson), Bee Duffell (Miss Dobson), Roger Avon (Electrician), Brian Peck (Technical Officer), John Graham (Inspector), Charles Lamb (Newsvendor).
SYNOPSIS: An ancient Martian spaceship is unearthed in London and proves to have powerful psychic effects on the people around.
COMMENT: Splendid feature film adaptation of Nigel Kneale’s 1958 6-part BBC TV serial with, despite budget constraints, impressive visual and special effects work. Baker directs with flair and with inventive use of the camera. Keir adds gravitas in a strong performance as Quatermass, whilst Glover plays the typically closed-minded army captain. Donald and Shelley are the scientists who work alongside Keir to prevent the alien threat from being released. The thrilling final act makes for an exciting conclusion.
NOTES: Originally released in the USA as FIVE MILLION YEARS TO EARTH. Followed by THE QUATERMASS CONCLUSION (1979).

Film Review – JAWS (1975)

Image result for jaws 1975JAWS (USA, 1975) *****
PRODUCTION: Distributor: Universal Pictures (USA), Cinema International Corporation (CIC) (UK); Production Company: Zanuck-Brown Productions / Universal Pictures; Release Date: 20 June 1975 (USA), 25 December 1975 (UK); Filming Dates: 2 May 1974 – 18 September 1974 and October 1974 – December 1974; Running Time: 124m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono (Westrex Recording System) | Dolby (Dolby Digital Surround 5.1) | Dolby Surround 7.1 (Blu-ray release); Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Panavision (anamorphic); Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1; BBFC Cert: 12.
CREW: Director: Steven Spielberg; Writer: Peter Benchley, Carl Gottlieb (based on the novel by Peter Benchley); Producer: David Brown, Richard D. Zanuck; Director of Photography: Bill Butler; Music Composer: John Williams; Film Editor: Verna Fields; Casting Director: Shari Rhodes; Production Designer: Joe Alves; Set Decorator: John M. Dwyer; Costumes: Louise Clark, Robert Ellsworth, Irwin Rose; Make-up: Del Armstrong, John Chambers, Jim Gillespie; Sound: John R. Carter, Robert L. Hoyt; Special Effects: Robert A. Mattey.
CAST: Roy Scheider (Brody), Robert Shaw (Quint), Richard Dreyfuss (Hooper), Lorraine Gary (Ellen Brody), Murray Hamilton (Vaughn), Carl Gottlieb (Meadows), Jeffrey Kramer (Hendricks), Susan Backlinie (Chrissie), Jonathan Filley (Cassidy), Ted Grossman (Estuary Victim), Chris Rebello (Michael Brody), Jay Mello (Sean Brody), Lee Fierro (Mrs. Kintner), Jeffrey Voorhees (Alex Kintner), Craig Kingsbury (Ben Gardner), Robert Nevin (Medical Examiner), Peter Benchley (Interviewer).
SYNOPSIS: When a gigantic great white shark begins to menace the small island community of Amity, a police chief, a marine scientist and grizzled fisherman set out to stop it.
COMMENT: Brilliantly filmed and edited with not a minute of screen time wasted. It was credited as the movie that created the summer blockbuster, but this remains an everyman movie full of thrills. Spielberg’s inventive framing and decision to leave the shark largely unseen until the final act demonstrate his astute approach to genre direction. Great performance from Shaw, Scheider and Dreyfuss and memorable music score from Williams helps to heighten the tension. The movie remains today a textbook example on how to shoot a thriller and maximise character empathy through great direction to actors.
NOTES: Won three Oscars – for Editing, Music and Sound. Extended version runs to 130m. Followed by three sequels beginning with JAWS 2 (1978).

Film Review – ARABIAN ADVENTURE (1979)

Image result for arabian adventure 1979ARABIAN ADVENTURE (UK, 1979) **½
      Distributor: British Lion Film Corporation (UK), Associated Film Distribution (AFD) (USA); Production Company: EMI Films / British Lion Film Corporation / Major Studio Partners; Release Date: 19 July 1979 (UK), 21 November 1979 (USA); Filming Dates: 24 July 1978 – October 1978; Running Time: 98m; Colour: Colour; Sound Mix: Dolby; Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1; BBFC Cert: U.
      Director: Kevin Connor; Writer: Brian Hayles; Executive Producer: Kevin Connor; Producer: John Dark; Director of Photography: Alan Hume; Music Composer: Ken Thorne; Film Editor: Barry Peters; Casting Director: Allan Foenander; Production Designer: Elliot Scott; Art Director: Jack Maxsted; Set Decorator: Terry Ackland-Snow; Costumes: Rosemary Burrows; Make-up: Yvonne Coppard, Robin Grantham; Sound: Jim Atkinson; Special Effects: George Gibbs; Visual Effects: Cliff Culley, Charles Staffell.
      Cast: Christopher Lee (Alquazar), Milo O’Shea (Khasim), Oliver Tobias (Prince Hasan), Emma Samms (Princess Zuleira), Puneet Sira (Majeed), Peter Cushing (Wazir Al Wuzara), Capucine (Vahishta), Mickey Rooney (Daad El Shur), John Wyman (Bahloul), John Ratzenberger (Achmed), Shane Rimmer (Abu), Hal Galili (Asaf), Elisabeth Welch (Beggarwoman), Suzanne Danielle (Eastern Dancer), Art Malik (Mamhoud), Jacob Witkin (Omar, the Goldsmith), Milton Reid (Jinnee), Roy Stewart (The Nubian).
      Synopsis: An evil magician seeks to gain power by obtaining a magic rose. A peasant boy and a Prince join forces to stop him.
      Comment: The last of five fantasy adventures made by director Connor with producer Dark. This hokey Arabian Nights tale owes much to the strong cast headed by Lee at his villainous best. However, Tobias lacks charisma and acting chops as the hero prince. Samms makes for an appealing princess whilst Rooney adds some comic relief and Cushing some gravitas in cameo roles. The action scenes are plentiful, but often sub-par with obvious choreography. The visual effects are average at best, as is evident in the climactic magic carpet battle. A fun adventure nonetheless for the undemanding.
      Notes: Feature film debut of Emma Samms.

Film Review – WARLORDS OF ATLANTIS (1978)

Related imageWARLORDS OF ATLANTIS (UK, 1978) **½
      Distributor: EMI Films (UK), Columbia Pictures (USA); Production Company: EMI Films / British Lion; Release Date: 5 May 1978; Filming Dates: 5 September 1977 – 13 January 1978; Running Time: 96m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono; Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1; BBFC Cert: PG.
      Director: Kevin Connor; Writer: Brian Hayles; Executive Producer: Jim Brown (uncredited); Producer: John Dark, Kevin Connor; Director of Photography: Alan Hume; Music Composer: Michael Vickers; Film Editor: Bill Blunden; Casting Director: Allan Foenander; Production Designer: Elliot Scott; Art Director: Jack Maxsted; Costumes: Lorna Hillyard, Monica Howe; Make-up: Robin Grantham; Sound: Jim Atkinson; Special Effects: John Richardson; Visual Effects: Charles Staffell.
      Cast: Doug McClure (Greg Collinson), Peter Gilmore (Charles Aitken), Shane Rimmer (Captain Daniels), Lea Brodie (Delphine), Michael Gothard (Atmir), Hal Galili (Grogan), John Ratzenberger (Fenn), Derry Power (Jacko), Donald Bisset (Professor Aitken), Ashley Knight (Sandy), Robert Brown (Briggs), Cyd Charisse (Atsil), Daniel Massey (Atraxon).
      Synopsis: Searching for the lost world of Atlantis, a professor and his associates are betrayed by the crew of their expedition’s ship, attracted by the fabulous treasures of Atlantis.
      Comment: The last and weakest of McClure’s four fantasy adventure movies with director Connor. The story and plot are derivative, but at least Connor keeps the action coming thick and fast and the set-pieces are well shot and edited. Monster effects are variable, with the best being the giant octopus. The inhabitants of Atlantis are stoic and bland with Gothard and Charisse giving one-note performances. However, McClure and Gilmore work well together as the heroes of the piece, echoing the former’s work with Peter Cushing on AT THE EARTH’S CORE (1976). Aka: WARLORDS OF THE DEEP.

Film Review – AT THE EARTH’S CORE (1976)

Peter Cushing, Doug McClure, and Caroline Munro in At the Earth's Core (1976)AT THE EARTH’S CORE (UK/USA, 1976) ***
      Distributor: British Lion Film Corporation (UK) / American International Pictures (A.I.P.) (USA); Production Company: Amicus Productions; Release Date: July 1976 (USA), 22 August 1976 (UK); Filming Dates: 26 January 1976 – mid April 1976; Running Time: 90m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono; Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1; BBFC Cert: PG.
      Director: Kevin Connor; Writer: Milton Subotsky (based on the novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs); Executive Producer: Harry N. Blum; Producer: John Dark, Max Rosenberg, Milton Subotsky; Director of Photography: Alan Hume; Music Composer: Michael Vickers; Film Editor: John Ireland, Barry Peters; Production Designer: Maurice Carter; Art Director: Bert Davey; Costumes: Rosemary Burrows; Make-up: Robin Grantham, Neville Smallwood; Sound: Jim Atkinson, George Stephenson; Special Effects: Ian Wingrove; Visual Effects: Charles Staffell.
      Cast: Doug McClure (David Innes), Peter Cushing (Dr. Abner Perry), Caroline Munro (Dia), Cy Grant (Ra), Godfrey James (Ghak), Sean Lynch (Hoojah), Keith Barron (Dowsett), Helen Gill (Maisie), Anthony Verner (Gadsby), Robert Gillespie (Photographer), Michael Crane (Jubal), Bobby Parr (Sagoth Chief), Andee Cromarty (Girl Slave).
      Synopsis: A Victorian era scientist and his assistant take a test run in their Iron Mole drilling machine and end up in a strange underground labyrinth ruled by a species of giant telepathic bird and full of prehistoric monsters and cavemen.
      Comment: Scatty, juvenile and low-budget fantasy adventure gets by on its camp approach to the material with Cushing excelling in one of his lightly comic and eccentric scientist roles. McClure makes for an effective and likeable hero and Munro is stunning as one of the scantily clad natives. The monsters betray the lack of funds, but the action is well-edited to disguise some of the limitations this presents the production. The script is tight but lacks any depth or set-up. Vickers provides an eerie electronic score and Connor directs with a great sense of fun which he balances with the eerie atmosphere created by the imaginative production design and Hume’s photography.
      Notes: Last film produced by Amicus, Hammer’s chief rival during the 1960s and ’70s.

Film Review – THE PEOPLE THAT TIME FORGOT (1977)

Image result for THE PEOPLE THAT TIME FORGOT 1977THE PEOPLE THAT TIME FORGOT (UK/USA, 1977) **½
      Distributor: Brent Walker PLC (UK), American International Pictures (AIP) (USA); Production Company: American International Pictures (AIP) / Amicus Productions; Release Date: 22 June 1977 (USA), 27 August 1977 (UK); Filming Dates: began 24 Jan 1977; Running Time: 91m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono; Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1; BBFC Cert: U.
      Director: Kevin Connor; Writer: Patrick Tilley (based on the novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs); Executive Producer: Samuel Z. Arkoff; Producer: John Dark; Director of Photography: Alan Hume; Music Composer: John Scott; Film Editor: John Ireland, Barry Peters; Production Designer: Maurice Carter; Art Director: Bert Davey, Fernando González; Set Decorator: Simon Wakefield; Costumes: ; Make-up: Robin Grantham; Sound: George Stephenson; Special Effects: Ian Wingrove, John Richardson; Visual Effects: Charles Staffell.
      Cast: Patrick Wayne (Ben McBride), Doug McClure (Bowen Tyler), Sarah Douglas (Charly), Dana Gillespie (Ajor), Thorley Walters (Norfolk), Shane Rimmer (Hogan), Tony Britton (Captain Lawton), John Hallam (Chung-Sha), David Prowse (Executioner), Milton Reid (Sabbala), Kiran Shah (Bolum), Richard LeParmentier (Lt. Whitby), Jimmy Ray (Lt. Graham), Tony McHale (Telegraphist).
      Synopsis: Major Ben McBride organises a mission to the Antarctic wastes to search for his friend (McClure) who has been missing in the region for several years.
      Comment: Okay sequel to THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT (1974) lacks the creative energy of the original but remains a mildly entertaining diversion. Wayne is rather wooden in the lead role, but Douglas and Walters compensate. McClure reprises his role from the first film in a guest slot. Effects are limited due to the lack of budget, but Connor gets as much excitement as he can from a rather flat script and stages some good action sequences and monster set-pieces.

Film Review – THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT (1974)

Image result for the land that time forgot 1975THE LAND THAT TIME FORGOT (UK/USA, 1975) ***
      Distributor: British Lion Film Corporation (UK), American International Pictures (AIP) (USA); Production Company: Amicus Productions / Edgar Rice Burroughs Inc. / Land Associates / Lion International; Release Date: 29 November 1974 (UK), 13 August 1975 (USA); Filming Dates: February 1974 – 18 April 1974; Running Time: 91m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Mono; Film Format: 35mm; Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1; BBFC Cert: U.
      Director: Kevin Connor; Writer: James Cawthorn, Michael Moorcock (based on the novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs); Executive Producer: Robert H. Greenberg; Producer: John Dark, Max Rosenberg, Milton Subotsky; Associate Producer: John Peverall; Director of Photography: Alan Hume; Music Composer: Douglas Gamley; Film Editor: John Ireland; Casting Director: ; Production Designer: Maurice Carter; Art Director: Bert Davey; Costumes: Julie Harris; Make-up: Tom Smith; Sound: Don Sharpe, George Stephenson; Special Effects: Derek Meddings; Visual Effects: Charles Staffell.
      Cast: Doug McClure (Bowen Tyler), John McEnery (Captain Von Schoenvorts), Susan Penhaligon (Lisa Clayton), Keith Barron (Bradley), Anthony Ainley (Dietz), Godfrey James (Borg), Bobby Parr (Ahm), Declan Mulholland (Olson), Colin Farrell (Whiteley), Ben Howard (Benson), Roy Holder (Plesser), Andrew McCulloch (Sinclair), Ron Pember (Jones), Grahame Mallard (Deusett), Andrew Lodge (Reuther), Brian Hall (Schwartz), Stanley McGeagh (Hiller), Peter Sproule (Hindle), Steve James (First Sto-Lu).
      Synopsis: During World War I, a German U-boat sinks a British ship and takes the survivors on board. After it takes a wrong turn, the submarine takes them to the unknown land of Caprona, where they find dinosaurs and neanderthals.
      Comment: This low-budget fantasy-adventure is great fun and its charm and energy help you forget the variable special effects. McClure enjoys himself as the square-jawed hero and has good support from a game British cast, including Penhaligon as a biologist and McClure’s love interest. Action scenes are well directed and the monster work as good as it could be for the budget. Themes around evolution add a layer of intelligence, but this is still primary juvenile entertainment.
      Notes: McEnery was dubbed by Anton Diffring. Followed by THE PEOPLE THAT TIME FORGOT (1977) and remade in 2009.

Film Review – GOODFELLAS (1990)

Image result for goodfellas 1990GOODFELLAS (USA, 1990) ****½
      Distributor: Warner Bros.; Production Company: Warner Bros; Release Date: 17 September 1990 (USA), 26 October 1990 (UK); Filming Dates: 3 May 1989 – 9 August 1989; Running Time: 146m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: Dolby SR; Film Format: 35mm (Eastman 5384); Film Process: Spherical; Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1; BBFC Cert: 18.
      Director: Martin Scorsese; Writer: Nicholas Pileggi, Martin Scorsese (based on the book “Wiseguy” by Nicholas Pileggi); Executive Producer: Barbara De Fina; Producer: Irwin Winkler; Associate Producer: Bruce S. Pustin; Director of Photography: Michael Ballhaus; Music Editor: Christopher Brooks; Film Editor: James Y. Kwei, Thelma Schoonmaker; Casting Director: Ellen Lewis; Production Designer: Kristi Zea; Art Director: Maher Ahmad; Set Decorator: Leslie Bloom; Costumes: Richard Bruno; Make-up: Carl Fullerton, Ilona Herman, Allen Weisinger; Sound: Skip Lievsay; Special Effects: Connie Brink.
      Cast: Robert De Niro (James Conway), Ray Liotta (Henry Hill), Joe Pesci (Tommy DeVito), Lorraine Bracco (Karen Hill), Paul Sorvino (Paul Cicero), Frank Sivero (Frankie Carbone), Tony Darrow (Sonny Bunz), Mike Starr (Frenchy), Frank Vincent (Billy Batts), Chuck Low (Morris Kessler), Frank DiLeo (Tuddy Cicero), Henny Youngman (Henny Youngman), Gina Mastrogiacomo (Janice Rossi), Catherine Scorsese (Tommy’s Mother), Charles Scorsese (Vinnie), Suzanne Shepherd (Karen’s Mother), Debi Mazar (Sandy), Margo Winkler (Belle Kessler), Welker White (Lois Byrd), Jerry Vale (Jerry Vale), Julie Garfield (Mickey Conway), Christopher Serrone (Young Henry), Elaine Kagan (Henry’s Mother), Beau Starr (Henry’s Father), Kevin Corrigan (Michael Hill), Michael Imperioli (Spider), Robbie Vinton (Bobby Vinton), Johnny Williams (Johnny Roastbeef), Daniel P. Conte (Dr. Dan), Tony Conforti (Tony), Frank Pellegrino (Johnny Dio), Ronald Maccone (Ronnie), Tony Sirico (Tony Stacks), Joseph D’Onofrio (Young Tommy), Steve Forleo (City Detective #1), Richard Dioguardi (City Detective #2), Frank Adonis (Anthony Stabile), John Manca (Nickey Eyes), Joseph Bono (Mikey Franzese), Katherine Wallach (Diane), Mark Evan Jacobs (Bruce), Angela Pietropinto (Cicero’s Wife), Marianne Leone (Tuddy’s Wife), Marie Michaels (Mrs. Carbone), LoNardo (Frenchy’s Wife), Melissa Prophet (Angie), Illeana Douglas (Rosie), Susan Varon (Susan), Elizabeth Whitcraft (Tommy’s Girlfriend at Copa), Clem Caserta (Joe Buddha), Samuel L. Jackson (Stacks Edwards), Fran McGee (Johnny Roastbeef’s Wife), Paul Herman (Dealer), Edward McDonald (Edward McDonald), Edward Hayes (Defense Attorney), Bo Dietl (Arresting Narc).
      Synopsis: Henry Hill and his friends work their way up through the mob hierarchy.
      Comment: Stylish adaptation of Pileggi’s book about real-life gangster Henry Hill. Scorcese extracts dark humour from the violent drama and moves the story along in expert fashion assisted by editors Kwei and Schoonmaker. DeNiro, Liotta and Pesci each give exceptional performances as the Goodfellas of the title trying to find their own way in a world of organised crime. The inevitable descent into mistrust and retribution is brilliantly handled.
      Notes: Pesci won a Best Supporting Actor Oscar.

Film Review – COLD PURSUIT (2019)

Image result for cold pursuit 2019COLD PURSUIT (USA, 2019) ***½
      Distributor: Lionsgate (USA), StudioCanal (UK); Production Company: StudioCanal / Paradox Films; Release Date: 8 February 2019 (USA), 22 February 2019 (UK); Filming Dates: March 2017; Running Time: 119m; Colour: Colour; Sound Mix: Dolby Digital (7.1 surround); Film Format: D-Cinema; Film Process: Digital Intermediate (4K) (master format); Aspect Ratio: 2.39:1; BBFC Cert: 15 – strong violence.
      Director: Hans Petter Moland; Writer: Frank Baldwin (based on a screenplay by Kim Fupz Aakeson); Executive Producer: Michael Dreyer, Shana Eddy-Grouf, Ron Halpern, Didier Lupfer, Paul Schwartzman; Producer: Finn Gjerdrum, Stein B. Kvae, Michael Shamberg, Ameet Shukla; Associate Producer: Nicolai Moland; Director of Photography: Philip Øgaard; Music Composer: George Fenton; Film Editor: Nicolaj Monberg; Casting Director: Avy Kaufman; Production Designer: Jørgen Stangebye Larsen; Art Director: Kendelle Elliott; Set Decorator: Peter Lando; Costumes: Anne Pedersen; Make-up: Krista Young; Sound: James Boyle; Special Effects: Jason Paradis; Visual Effects: Jan Guilfoyle, Martin Lake, Noga Alon Stein.
      Cast: Liam Neeson (Nels Coxman), Laura Dern (Grace Coxman), Micheál Richardson (Kyle Coxman), Michael Eklund (Speedo), Bradley Stryker (Limbo), Wesley MacInnes (Dante), Tom Bateman (Trevor ‘Viking’ Calcote), Domenick Lombardozzi (Mustang), Nicholas Holmes (Ryan), Jim Shield (Jaded Coroner), Aleks Paunovic (Detective Osgard), Glenn Ennis (Night Club Bouncer), Benjamin Hollingsworth (Dexter), John Doman (John ‘Gip’ Gipsky), Emmy Rossum (Kim Dash), Chris W. Cook (Ski Bum), Venus Terzo (Mother), Dani Alvarado (Daughter), Julia Jones (Aya), Michael Adamthwaite (Santa), William Forsythe (Brock), Elizabeth Thai (Ahn), David O’Hara (Sly), Gus Halper (Bone), Elysia Rotaru (Diner Waitress), Kyle Nobess (Simon Legrew), Victor Zinck Jr. (Drunken Ski Dude), Raoul Max Trujillo (Thorpe), Nathaniel Arcand (Smoke), Glen Gould (War Dog), Mitchell Saddleback (Avalanche), Christopher Logan (Shiv), Tom Jackson (White Bull), Bart Anderson (Blizzard Bartender), Gary Sekhon (Denver Cabbie), Arnold Pinnock (The Eskimo), Ben Cotton (Windex), Emily Maddison (Gorgeous Woman), Glenn Wrage (Kurt), Michael Bean (Parson), Ben Sullivan (Teen), Travis MacDonald (Ski Lift Attendant), Manna Nichols (Minya), Loretta Walsh (Resort Clerk), Nels Lennarson (Chuck Schalm), Max Montesi (Paragliding Instructor), Peter Strand Rumpel (Viking’s Thug).
      Synopsis: A grieving snowplough driver seeks out revenge against the drug dealers who killed his son.
      Comment: Darkly comic thriller has much to commend it as Neeson plays it straight against a quirky cast of characters. The extreme violence is delivered via a series of well-shot action sequences. Where the story falls down is in not seeing through some of the elements of its plot – the relationship between Neeson and his wife Dern is not fully resolved and the theme of father-son relationships heavily hinted at across a number of the core characters is not fully explored. What remains is an entertaining and stylish story that only scratches at the surface of its potential.
      Notes: Based on the 2014 Norwegian film IN ORDER OF DISAPPEARANCE.

Film Review – THE GODFATHER: PART III (1990)

Image result for the godfather part iiiTHE GODFATHER: PART III (USA, 1990) ***½
      Distributor: Paramount Pictures (USA), United International Pictures (UIP) (UK); Production Company: Paramount Pictures / Zoetrope Studios; Release Date: 12 December 1990 (USA), 8 March 1991 (UK); Filming Dates: 27 November 1989 – 25 May 1990; Running Time: 162m; Colour: Technicolor; Sound Mix: 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints) | Dolby SR (35 mm prints); Film Format: 35mm (spherical) (Eastman 5384), 70mm (blow-up) (Eastman 5384); Film Process: Super 35; Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1; BBFC Cert: 15.
      Director: Francis Ford Coppola; Writer: Francis Ford Coppola, Mario Puzo; Executive Producer: Fred Fuchs, Nicholas Gage; Producer: Francis Ford Coppola; Associate Producer: Marina Gefter; Director of Photography: Gordon Willis; Music Composer: Carmine Coppola; Music Supervisor: Stephan R. Goldman; Film Editor: Lisa Fruchtman, Barry Malkin, Walter Murch; Casting Director: Janet Hirshenson, Jane Jenkins, Roger Mussenden; Production Designer: Dean Tavoularis; Art Director: Alex Tavoularis; Costumes: Milena Canonero; Make-up: Fabrizio Sforza; Sound: Gloria S. Borders; Special Effects: R. Bruce Steinheimer.
      Cast: Al Pacino (Don Michael Corleone), Diane Keaton (Kay Adams Michelson), Talia Shire (Connie Corleone Rizzi), Andy Garcia (Vincent Mancini), Eli Wallach (Don Altobello), Joe Mantegna (Joey Zasa), George Hamilton (B.J. Harrison), Bridget Fonda (Grace Hamilton), Sofia Coppola (Mary Corleone), Raf Vallone (Cardinal Lamberto), Franc D’Ambrosio (Anthony Vito Corleone), Donal Donnelly (Archbishop Gilday), Richard Bright (Al Neri), Helmut Berger (Frederick Keinszig), Don Novello (Dominic Abbandando), John Savage (Father Andrew Hagen), Franco Citti (Calo), Mario Donatone (Mosca), Vittorio Duse (Don Tommasino), Enzo Robutti (Don Licio Lucchesi), Michele Russo (Spara), Al Martino (Johnny Fontane), Robert Cicchini (Lou Pennino), Rogerio Miranda (Twin Bodyguard Armand), Carlos Miranda (Twin Bodyguard Francesco), Vito Antuofermo (Anthony ‘The Ant’ Squigliaro), Robert Vento (Father John), Willie Brown (Party Politician), Jeannie Linero (Lucy Mancini), Jeanne Savarino Pesch (Francesca Corleone), Janet Savarino Smith (Kathryn Corleone), Tere Livrano (Teresa Hagen), Carmine Caridi (Albert Volpe), Don Costello (Frank Romano), Al Ruscio (Leo Cuneo), Mickey Knox (Marty Parisi), Rick Aviles (Mask #1), Michael Bowen (Mask #2), Brett Halsey (Douglas Michelson), Gabriele Torrei (Enzo the Baker), John Abineri (Hamilton Banker), Brian Freilino (Stockholder), Gregory Corso (Unruly Stockholder), Marino Masé (Lupo), Dado Ruspoli (Vanni), Valeria Sabel (Sister Vincenza), Remo Remotti (Cardinal Sistine), Luigi Laezza (Keinszig Killer), Giuseppe Pianviti (Keinszig Killer), Santo Indelicato (Guardia del Corpo), Simonetta Stefanelli (Apollonia Vitelli-Corleone (archiveFootage)), Francesco Paolo Bellante (Autista di Don Tommasino), Paco Reconti (Gesu), Mimmo Cuticchio (Puppet Narrator), Richard Honigman (Party Reporter), Nicky Blair (Nicky the Casino Host), Anthony Guidera (Anthony, the Bodyguard), Frank Tarsia (Frankie, the Bodyguard), Diana Agostini (Woman with Child at Street Fair), Jessica DiCicco (Child), Catherine Scorsese (Woman in Cafe), Ida Bernardini (Woman in Cafe), Joe Drago (Party Security), David Hume Kennerly (Party Photographer), James D. Damiano (Son Playing Soccer), Michael Boccio (Father of Soccer Player), Erica Yohn (Governess), Teresa Tirelli (Midwife).
      Synopsis: In the final instalment of the GODFATHER Trilogy, an aging Don Michael Corleone seeks to legitimize his crime family’s interests and remove himself from the violent underworld but is kept back by the ambitions of the young.
      Comment: Unnecessary continuation of the story is initially very uneven before improving significantly when the action moves to Sicily for the final act. Main issue is with a script that lacks the depth of character of the earlier movies and a pair of weak performances from Garcia and Sofia Coppola, whose love affair lacks any level of intensity and feels like it has drifted in from a lesser movie. Fortunately, Pacino is once again excellent in the lead role and supported well by Keaton, Wallach and Shire. Coppola admits the movie was made purely for financial reasons. It adds little to the enormous legacy of the first two movies but taken in isolation has enough impressive sequences – notably the opera finale – to pack a punch.
      Notes: Extended version runs 170m.