Book Review – THE MUSKETEER’S SEAMSTRESS (2007) by Sarah D’Almeida

THE MUSKETEER’S SEAMSTRESS (2007) ***
by Sarah D’Almeida (Sarah Hoyt)
Published by Berkley, 2007, 332pp (315pp)
Cover Art: Rick Farrell
Cover Design: Steven Ferlauto
Interior Text Design: Tiffany Estreicher
ISBN: 978-0-425-21489-3
includes 10-page preview of THE MUSKETEER’S APPRENTICE.
      Blurb: Aramis emerges from the water closet to find his lover, a duchess, murdered on her bed. The room is locked, and Aramis is the only one who could have entered it. He’s sure he didn’t do it, but no one else believes him. Even Monsieur de Treville, Captain of Musketeers, doubts Aramis’s word. Aramis must leave Paris and go on the run, entrusting the solving of the murder, and the defence of his honour, his freedom and his very life to Athos, Porthos and D’Artagnan. Can “one for all” carry the day when every powerful person in France believes Aramis a murderer and when powerful interests would gladly frame Aramis for it?
     Comment: Being a huge fan of Alexandre Dumas’ THE THREE MUSKETEERS (1844), I was delighted to find a series of books featuri8ng the characters written by Sarah Hoyt under the pseudonym of Sarah D’Almeira. THE MUSKETEER’S SEAMSTRESS is the second book in a series of five, in which Dumas’ Musketeers effectively act as detectives looking to solve mysteries in 1620s France. The books are set within the timeframe of Dumas’ novel and so include real-life historical figures as well as original Dumas characters. This particular story is basically a locked room mystery, with Aramis seemingly the only possible suspect in the murder of his mistress, necessitating the Musketeers having to work to clear his name. The writing style emulates that of Dumas without being slavish to it. Whilst written in the third person, the story is told from the point of view of each of the Musketeers as they look for clues to unravel the mystery and fight duels with the Cardinal’s guards who are looking to hunt down Aramis. Whilst this approach retains the key mystery novel device of putting the reader in the head of the detective, it also constrains the story by not opening it up to the wider cast of characters. Cardinal Richelieu, who is at the centre of the investigation, only appears in the closing chapter. This robs the story of the scale and tension between the characters that Dumas managed to create in his original novel. That said, this is still an enjoyable read and is recommended to fans of Dumas and historical mysteries.

The Musketeer Mysteries series:
1. Death of a Musketeer (Berkley, November 2006, ISBN 0-425-21292-0)
2. The Musketeer’s Seamstress (Berkley, April 2007, ISBN 978-0-425-21489-3) ***
3. The Musketeer’s Apprentice (Berkley, September 2007, ISBN 978-0-425-21769-6)
4. A Death in Gascony (Berkley, April 2008, ISBN 978-0-425-22101-3)
5. Dying by the Sword (Berkley, December 2008, ISBN 978-0-425-22461-8)

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